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scholarshit:

In 2013 I opened an exhibition in Paris called NEGUS in Paris. The title is a derivation on the controversial track “Niggas in Paris” from Jay-Z and Kanye West’s Watch the Throne LP. The work in the exhibit featured a mash-up of lyrics from “Niggas…” along with poetry and writing from the Negritude movement. 
Negritude is a French literary and art movement from the 1930s. Popularized through the writings of Black thinkers from the Francophone diaspora such as Aimé Césaire and Leopold Senghor among others, Negritude sought to instill Black pride while rejecting French colonialism and racist oppression. Negre was used as a derogatory term, much like nigger, to demean and insult Black people. Coming from the term negre - French for Black or blackness, Negritude sought to reverse the negative connotations of the term and take ownership of Blackness, to claim it as a site of power and beauty.
Sometimes we can gain new insights and new interpretations of words and ideas by simply the context. Combining Negritude and hip-hop might give us a new vocabulary for engaging the ideas and thoughts expressed within each movement. Here are a few of the drawings from the collection including a couple new ones which continue to reinterpret Negritude through a hip-hop lens.
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scholarshit:

In 2013 I opened an exhibition in Paris called NEGUS in Paris. The title is a derivation on the controversial track “Niggas in Paris” from Jay-Z and Kanye West’s Watch the Throne LP. The work in the exhibit featured a mash-up of lyrics from “Niggas…” along with poetry and writing from the Negritude movement. 
Negritude is a French literary and art movement from the 1930s. Popularized through the writings of Black thinkers from the Francophone diaspora such as Aimé Césaire and Leopold Senghor among others, Negritude sought to instill Black pride while rejecting French colonialism and racist oppression. Negre was used as a derogatory term, much like nigger, to demean and insult Black people. Coming from the term negre - French for Black or blackness, Negritude sought to reverse the negative connotations of the term and take ownership of Blackness, to claim it as a site of power and beauty.
Sometimes we can gain new insights and new interpretations of words and ideas by simply the context. Combining Negritude and hip-hop might give us a new vocabulary for engaging the ideas and thoughts expressed within each movement. Here are a few of the drawings from the collection including a couple new ones which continue to reinterpret Negritude through a hip-hop lens.
Zoom Info

scholarshit:

In 2013 I opened an exhibition in Paris called NEGUS in Paris. The title is a derivation on the controversial track “Niggas in Paris” from Jay-Z and Kanye West’s Watch the Throne LP. The work in the exhibit featured a mash-up of lyrics from “Niggas…” along with poetry and writing from the Negritude movement. 

Negritude is a French literary and art movement from the 1930s. Popularized through the writings of Black thinkers from the Francophone diaspora such as Aimé Césaire and Leopold Senghor among others, Negritude sought to instill Black pride while rejecting French colonialism and racist oppression. Negre was used as a derogatory term, much like nigger, to demean and insult Black people. Coming from the term negre - French for Black or blackness, Negritude sought to reverse the negative connotations of the term and take ownership of Blackness, to claim it as a site of power and beauty.

Sometimes we can gain new insights and new interpretations of words and ideas by simply the context. Combining Negritude and hip-hop might give us a new vocabulary for engaging the ideas and thoughts expressed within each movement. Here are a few of the drawings from the collection including a couple new ones which continue to reinterpret Negritude through a hip-hop lens.

kateoplis:

A street prostitute in Dallas may make as little as $5 per sex act. But pimps can take in $33,000 a week in Atlanta, where the sex business brings in an estimated $290 million per year. It is not nearly as lucrative in Denver, where prostitution and other elements of an underground trade are worth about $40 million.” NYT In-Depth

Atlanta’s underground sex trade is larger than Seattle, D.C., and Denver combined. …

[C]oercion and encouragement from family members to make money [is] a bigger factor in persuading women to go into (and stay in) prostitution than physical violence.”

"If you add all the underground economies together, you’ll see the largest combined black markets (by city) are: Atlanta, Miami, San Diego, and Dallas. Across the studied cities, the largest underground market is sex, followed by drugs, then guns."

8 Facts About the US Sex Economy

‘Africa emerging toast of foreign investors’

prepaidafrica:

AFRICA has continued to receive more interest as an investment destination from investors looking to emerging markets to access their growth potential, according to a report issued by professional services firm- PwC.

Essentially, a significant number of corporate executives have declared their company’s intentions of growing their presence in Africa, and the number of global companies looking to establish a foothold on the continent has increased. These are some of the findings of PwCs’ sixth edition of its biennial Valuation Methodology Survey.

The publication titled ‘An African perspective: Valuation methodology survey 2012’ reflects the views of 49 financial analysts and corporate financiers. This year, the study broadens the reach of the previous Southern African surveys by including perspectives from analysts in East and West Africa.

The Partner and Head of Deals at PwC, Farouk Gumel, said: “A key characteristic of the post-2008 recession period has been the increase in prominence of Africa as an investment destination. With an already higher than average growth rate, Africa is fast becoming an attractive place to do business – even more so as the vast informal trade sector on the continent means that measured growth over the past decade is likely to have been understated.”

HELP STOP THE ELIMINATION OF ARTS FUNDING IN FULTON COUNTY!!!

Arts Funding in Fulton County has been in a steady decline. Over the past five years the Department of Arts and Culture funding has been cut an average of 14-20% annually, and since 2001 the cut to funding has been over one million dollars.  While these were difficult cuts, they were in line with unilateral cuts across County departments.  Our current scenario is diferent and much more dire.  The County Manager has recommended a TOTAL ELIMINATION OF ARTS FUNDING FROM THE BUDGET.  The Department of Arts and Culture would cease to exist, Arts Centers in Fulton County communities would be closed, Contracts for Services funding to arts organizations in the County would be eliminated as well as all other programs that support the work of artists and culturalists in  our community.

I am a realist and understand that in order to balance the budget, cuts have to be made.  The Commissioners have a difficult job, no doubt.  However the EXTREME position of totally ELIMINATING funding doesn’t serve anyone very well.  The idea that the County Manager sees arts and culture and libraries as “expendable” cuts is the first issue.  But that aside for the moment, the County Manager’s proposed cuts include the very elements a community needs to develop, innovate and thrive.  Participation in art and culture allows us to explore and embrace our humanity more than anything else.  You can call it idealism if you wish, but I call it keeping it real.  In dollars and cents I mean that pulling arts and culture out of a community might balance the budget in the short term but it depletes the quality of life in the long term.  What kind of communities are we developing for the future?  Failing education systems, crumbling infrastructures and increased crime has no balance when you remove the balance and the remedy.  We actually need some of the creative solutions that artists offer to help figure this out, but that’s another blog. 

Today, it’s time to mount up in opposition to this short sighted proposal and to let our voices be heard about the kind of communities we want to live in.  My Fulton County Arts Council colleagues need your help and  recommend the following steps. 

1. Contact Your Commissioner!  The Commissioners are politicians who like to be politicians.  When their constituency calls or sends emails, they listen because if they don’t, they might lose that politician gig.  Get their attention over the next few days and let them know that you want them to support Arts and Culture in Fulton County.  Voting any other way is unacceptable!

District 1 (At-Large)  Chairman John Eaves, 404-612-8206, john.eaves@fultoncountyga.gov

District 2 (At-Large)  Commissioner Robb Pitts, 404-612-8210, robb.pitts@fultoncountyga.gov

District 3  Commissioner Liz Hausmann, 404-612-8213, liz.hausmann@fultoncountyga.gov

District 4  Commissioner Tom Lowe, 404-612-8218, tom.lowe@fultoncountyga.gov

District 5  Commissioner Emma Darnell, 404-612-8222, emma.darnell@fultoncountyga.gov

District 6  Commissioner Joan Garner, 404-612-8226, joan.garner@fultoncountyga.gov

District 7 Commissioner William “Bill” Edwards, 404-612-8230, commissioner.edwards@fultoncountyga.gov

2. Join Us at Wednesday’s Board of Commissioner’s (BOC) Meeting! This is the only opportunity for you to publicly address the commissioners on this issue.  The meeting will be held on August 21 at 10 AM in the Assembly Hall at 141 Pryor Street.  The recommendations will be presented to the Board formally at this meeting for consideration.  We are encouraging everyone to wear green so our presence can be recognized. 

This effort will hopefully help us maintain more of our annual Arts and Culture funding than not, but as a creative community we have to start innovating and figuring out new ways to fund the arts in Fulton County and Atlanta.  Let me know how you are supporting this effort so we know how effective we are being in getting the word out. Thank you for your action on this matter.  It matters!

Leatrice Ellzy, Fulton County Arts Council Member (District 2)

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